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Builds

LEGO Minifig Display Case

I previously built a minifig display case but it was big, heavy, and awkward. It also did not have a glass cover in the front and seemed to collect lots of dust, so I decided to redo it.

The Tools

  • Fusion 360 / Lightburn
  • 60 watt CO2 laser
  • staple gun
  • drill (only for pilot holes)

The Materials

  • 1/4 inch MDF
  • 5x3mm circular neodymium magnets
  • plexiglass
  • support board
  • sawtooth picture frame mounts
  • epoxy
  • hot glue gun

The Build

Shelves with engraved placement markings

I decided to make it 5 columns 4 rows of minifigs so 20 per display case. The Fusion360 design is totally parametric (I think) so I can easily adjust these to customize it.

Case put together

There are 3 types of material used. 1/4 MDF for the frame and shelves, the white support board (like you get from cheap bookshelves), and plexiglass for the front cover.

M3 nuts and bolts to hold the frame together

I used bolts for the 4 corners of the frame. I did not want to use glue. Here you can see the notch that holds the M3 bolts.

Glass with magnets holding the cover

I used neodymium magnets, 5x3mm circles, to hold the front glass together. The 1st and 3rd shelves have notches where I used epoxy to glue 4 magnets to the shelf. There are also 3mm holes cut in the plexiglass. It’s kind of weird, but works and I didn’t have to use any hinges.

Added the minifigs

I used a hot glue gun to mount the minifigs using the engraged indicators for perfect spacing!

Small collection of figures

After the first one was a success, I made 2 more. Still need another one!

Mounted using picture frame hangers

I used 2 sawtooth picture frame mounts per display case to mount everything to the wall. All done!

Mistakes

  • probably could have designed the frame mounts in the other direction so the frame can sit flush on a flat surface

STL for LEGO Clock Mount

STL for LEGO Flashlight Mount

Lego Flashlight Wall Mount

Lego Clock Wall Mount

Categories
Builds

Giant LEGO Minifig Mount

Instead of a display case, I wanted to make a wall mount with lego pegs that my large LEGO minifig lights and clocks could sit in. They come in 2 different sizes.

Measured the buttons to fit into the minifig
Categories
Builds

CO2 Laser Control Panel

I absolutely LOVE my Class 4 CO2 Laser cutter/engraver. But it definitely needs some improvements. I’ve added custom lighting, camera, and analog milliamp reader to it and needed a control panel to manage everything. I designed this as an inset panel that controls the AC lines (which are connected to a new UPS).

Prototype test plate

My 3d printer always prints a little larger. My designs need about 0.5-1mm tolerance for fittings so I printed out this flat plate to test the panel mounted switches and hole placements.

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Builds

Squeeze Bottle Rack

In order to save counter space, I designed a rack in Fusion 360 to cut out 1/4 inch MDF rack. The rack is designed to be mounted to the side of a cabinet, and use double sided mounting tape (along with some physics) to securely hold the bottles in place.

Here it is mounted, perfect fit, snug

Categories
Builds

Yi Home Window Mount

  • Build Time: 4 hours
  • Build Difficulty: 2

Yi Home cameras are inexpensive, but you can’t use them outdoors. I built this 2 piece window mount (with SVG sticker for those who have a Cricut). This project was an exercise using Fusion 360 and threads, as well as practicing assembling components which is much like assembling parts in SolidWorks.

The Tools

  • 3D printer
  • Cricut Maker
  • Fusion 360
  • Cricut Maker

The Materials

  • PLA filament
  • double sided mounting tape
  • vinyl adhesive
  • Yi Home Camera

The Design

In order for the Yi Home IR (night) lights to work, the camera must be completely touching the glass of the window you’re mounting it do. Since mounting tape comes in different thicknesses, I decided to make this 2 pieces with threads so that the depth could be adjusted.

Mount the base to a clean window with your choice of double sided mounting tape, insert the camera into the other piece, screw in the camera until you feel it press up against the glass. If you leave a gap, you will see the reflection of the infrared lights.

Final printed product

Here is the final 2 piece product mounted to the window. It works great! The threads are really tight, and had to do some light sanding and screw and unscrew many many times to wear down the edge a bit.

Categories
Builds

Triathlon Bike Phone Mount

  • Build Time: 3 days
  • Build Difficulty: 3

I spend hours and hours on my bike. I needed an aerodynamic custom phone mount designed specifically for my phone/bike setup. This is my first multi-part assembly in Solidworks. So satisfying!

My Ironman triathlon bike.. a Felt DA3

Before I begin, let’s stop and take a look at this beautiful bike. It’s not as high end as some of the $15k+ bikes out there, but it’s gotten me throw many Ironman races.

The Tools

  • 3D printer
  • digital caliper

The Materials

  • M2 screws and nuts of varying length
  • PLA filament

The Design

Assembly built in solidworks

I measured the diameter of my aero bars and also the distance between the stem where it would be mounted. I decided on a 3 part assembly to make it easier to print. The pieces of the assembly where designed to be held together with M2 screws/bolts.

The Build

Width fail… used the wrong variable

Always used variable names in Solidworks, but also give them meaningful names so you don’t end up using the wrong measurement for the mount gap width here to account for the stem.

Design fixed and reprinted

After re-printing the design, I pushed in the hex nuts into the slots I designed and screwed bottom mount together. The 3D printer needs a good amount of tolerance for a good fit. I used 2mm for these M2 screws but the fitting was too tight.